You're reading...
Vegetarianism

Third generation vegetarians

My friend Mel is a recent mum. This posting is for her. As a vegetarian, Mel wants to bring her daughter up as a vegetarian, which is creating a bit of a debate within family and close friends who are not vegetarians.

Mel, I want to introduce you to Michael’s first cousin Julie and her family in the Gold Coast. Both Julie and her partner David have been vegetarians well over 30 years (32 years for Julie and over 40 years for David) and together they raised five kids. Of the five, four are still vegetarians today.

The eldest, James is a professional surfer. Check out his website: (http://jamesbillywatson.com/blog/index.php?blog=2#links) James competes professionally both internationally and within Australia. Yes, he is a vegetarian.

Both Sam are Sacha are new mothers themselves. Sacha has been a vegetarian all her life and is married to Troy a recent vegetarian and together they have a 2 year-old boy Neon who is being brought up a vegetarian.

Sam is mum to Harlow who is 19 months old and like her cousin, she too is a vegetarian. Sam and her husband Shaun are expecting their second child in November.

Next in the family is Sarah, who is vegetarian at home but not when she is out and about.

The youngest is doing his final in IT at Griffith University and like the rest of the Watson clan is a fulltime vegetarian.

Both James and Josh are well over six foot, lanky, healthy and athletic. The three sisters are tall, healthy and svelte. Being vegetarian helps, IMO. And the two you cousins are very healthy and delightful toddlers.  Both kids are very active, a bundle of fun and a great addition to the vegetarian clan – three generations of vegetarian.

Julie and her family are a source of inspiration for people struggling to raise a vegetarian family.  Both Julie and David are as fit as a horse; they are always vibrant and full of beans.

I have asked Julie to share her experience in raising five young kids on a vegetarian lifestyle:

Q1: What was the greatest challenge in raising a family as vegetarian, when they were younger?

Actually, Zainil, we never really had any issues. I think , probably because we were both vegetarian & had been for some time it just came naturally, didn’t have to think about it.

Q2: How do you maintain a well balance healthy diet for the kids when they were growing up?

They, from the start had to eat what was put in front of them, ha ha, old school eh?? They didn’t always enjoy the taste of all their vegies like most kids but with perseverance & ‘no dessert until you’ve cleaned up your plate’ (ha ha) all vegies became delicious in time.  We did also have the egg burgers & hot chips occasions too, lots of fun, not good for you, & afterwards a cup of tea for all to wash down the grease!!

Q3: If you were to it again today, what would you do differently?

Nothing really but would choose organic food where possible – that wasn’t a readily available option in the ‘old days’  (another ha ha)

Q4: What advice would you give to young mothers who want to raise their kids as vegetarians?

If they are already vegetarian, then it’s easy. As they are youngsters you just have to make sure their protein requirements are met…..e.g. – Mexican food ( real kid tucker) made with organic beans & whole grain brown rice will give them a perfect protein.  Greens are very important, our children enjoyed spinach pie.  In fact our ‘roast’ dinner favourite would be spinach rice (that would be called risotto now) with crumbed tofu & roast or steamed vegies. We do eat eggs & that’s an easy way to inject protein too.

Q5: What’s the biggest benefit, in your opinion, in raising your family as vegetarians?

Our children have an appreciation for good, fresh food.  They are easy to please, will eat anything if it’s ‘alive’, so, there aren’t any fussy eaters amongst our lot – have never been tolerant of the fussy eater….ha ha

There’s a great sharing that continues today of food, family dinners means everyone helping out in the kitchen – great fun!!.  We love it when Zainil comes up to stay, her tempeh pasta has become a staple!!!

Q6: How do you feel about your grandchildren being raised as vegetarians?

It’s great!! Our eldest daughter Sacha & her husband Troy are both vegetarians & keen cooks.  There’s some good Mexican at their house & Troy makes a mean pizza

Sam’s husband Shaun is not vegetarian (but really almost is these days ) This has not proved to be a problem for them at all. In fact, when they go out for dinner he often has the vegetarian option, especially if we go out for food as an extended family!! We order many different dishes for the table – huge variety…he loves it.  The little people love the food they get – they go through stages of course but you just have to be consistent as with everything to do with children

Thank you Julie for your time. I hope Julie’s experience and that of her family will inspire other parents in their own vegetarian journey.

REDUCE. RECYCLE. REUSE. REVITALISE. RELOCALISE.

Four of the five Watson siblings

The Watson clan - three generations of vegetarians

Advertisements

About Urban permaculturist

I have an interest in sustainability; from food security to renewable energy. I am also a keen food gardener and vegetarian cook. For more information, check out my blog at: www.platelicking.wordpress.com/

Discussion

2 thoughts on “Third generation vegetarians

  1. Thanks Zainil for writing on this topic. Its a real hot potato, quite flammable socially and domestically. I am tired of having to contend with arguments such as “vegetables have feelings too you know” or “the reason your so short is cos you don’t eat meat.” The argument tends to be emotional, but not from my side. I stick to the facts: vegetarians have lower incidences of cancer, in particular colon cancer, iron is obtainable through green veg plus lentils, eating meat is bad for the environment because of land erosion and methane, not to mention bad for animals through current farming and slaughtering methods etc etc.And as for my daughters right to choose: well that works both ways, doesn’t it?

    Posted by Melanie | July 3, 2010, 12:22 am
    • I hear you Mel. I know I am lucky that I am married to a vegetarian whose family members are 80% vegetarians. But it is different with my own family. At 14 when I announced my intention to become vegetarian. my mother’s reaction was, “Not while you are under my roof.” I became a vegetarian much later in life, but it was one of the best decisions on my life. And it is factual that vegetarians have lower incidence of cancer and other illness like high cholesterol, high blood pressure, etc. I advocate organic food. I know it is a bit more than conventional but it is becoming more and more mainstream. Factory farming is hideous. Complete disrespect for what is sacred, which is life itself.

      Let me know if I can be on any help. Direct people to read my interview with Julie and her eldest son’s blog. James is a very competitive surfer, and a successful one too. Carl Lewis the American athletic is a vegetarian. In actual many successful sportspersons are vegetarian.

      Keep well and thanks for visiting my blog.

      Zainil

      Posted by platelicking | July 4, 2010, 1:28 am

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Member of The Internet Defense League

%d bloggers like this: